Tag Archives: Prof. Enrique Soriano

The Destructive Effect of Poor Succession Planning

sept 11

Yu Pang-lin

A property mogul has decided to donate his entire £1.2 billion pound fortune to charity, leaving his wife and kids with nothing.

He had a special interest in helping those with cataracts in their eyes. Since 2003, his foundation has helped restore the sight of more than 300,000 people from more than 20 provinces and autonomous regions across China, including some poverty-stricken areas in Qinghai, Gansu, Yunnan and Guizhou provinces.

Yu attributed his desire to help others with his experiences as a young man. In the 1940s, Yu had worked as a journalist and an editor for a newspaper, learning about the hardships of people in poverty. He moved to Hong Kong in 1958, and made a living in the early years with many jobs, including as a cleaner, handyman and construction worker. He later founded his own real estate company, then expanded to other areas, including tourism, hotels and healthcare.

In the 1980s, Yu started donating money to build schools, emergency centres, public bus routes, tunnels, fountains and other infrastructure projects. In 2007, he was on the list of world’s top philanthropists selected by Time magazine.

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“If my children are more capable than me, it’s not necessary to leave a lot of money to them. If they are incompetent, a lot of money will only be harmful to them,”

Hong Kong Real Estate Billionaire Yu Pang-lin

Yu is the founder of the Yu Pang-lin Foundation dedicated to healthcare, education and disaster relief. He was believed to be China’s first billionaire to donate an entire fortune to charity.

Alarming Number of Family Business Failures

In my work as Family Business coach doing the rounds in Asia the past five years, I have witnessed a rapid increase of family business disputes bitterly adjudicated in courtrooms because of poor governance and harmful wealth and ownership distribution.

In a Family Enterprise Trend report by my consulting firm, W+B Family Advisory, it researched on the average age of business owners who are going through “rush” transitions.

The study showed more than half were 70 years old or more. The firm also identified the top five major sources of dispute:

1. Money as a result of ownership misalignment and wealth distribution

2. Control and Power struggle among siblings and or cousins

3. Poor succession programs that bred conflict

4. Wrong policies related compensation, dividend policies and incentive programs

5. Employment for everyone. Despite their lack of experience and competence, family members are thrust into leadership positions because of their surnames

Summarizing the report and analyzing why conflict and tension happens among these enterprises, it highlighted the following findings:

“Business owners in general procrastinated and did not see the urgency of initiating governance in the early stages of the business cycle. They were just too busy growing the business.

In the latter stages when health issues surface often and disagreements were becoming frequent, owners would suddenly realize that the children were not prepared to assume full control of the business when they (parents) are no longer around. In short, there was a very high probability that these family enterprises were headed to separation due to internal squabbles.”

Litigation Can Scar Family Relationshipsfor Life

My role as governance coach is to prevent and deter senseless and unnecessary family tension from escalating into a full blown and irreversible family feud. That if left to feed on its own, will spill over and convert the courtroom into the next family battleground.

With the exception of lawyers from both sides, nobody wins in a messy litigation process. They are just plain expensive, personal and can scar relationships for life.

Inevitably, whatever comes out of any court case can produce a debilitating effect not just on warring family members but also on the financial state of the enterprise.

Why is conflict pervasive?

As the business leader or visionary gets old, he or she has to naturally pass on the business to the heirs. Unfortunately, many of these owner managers follow certain traditions to a fault.

a. They do not want to see their own business empire falling apart as a result of division of wealth

b. They want their children to stay together in harmony so they can continue the business

c. They have very strong preference towards their male offspring to carry the mandate in the next generational cycle

d. But they are not open to Non family professionals joining the business

e. There are no entry and exit rules for family members and in-laws

To be continued…

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

 

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Businesses Must Aspire to Reach 100 years (Part 2)

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Cosmos Bottling Corporation

One of the more popular alternative soda brands in the Philippines after the war was a product of the Manila Aerated Water Factory, located on Misericordia St., Manila. It was founded way back in 1918 by Wong Ning, a Guangdong native who migrated to the Philippines.

The eldest of his 7 children—Henry Gao-Hong Wong—rebuilt the business post-war and renamed it in 1945 as COSMOS Bottling Corporation. Cosmos is the first softdrink manufacturer in the country.

Among its branded products include Pop Cola, Sarsi, Cheers Lemon, Orange and Ruby, Jaz Cola and Sparkle. Sarsi and Sarsi Light are directed at the Class A and B markets while Pop, Jaz, Sparkle and Cheers brands are primarily marketed to the Class C and D segments.

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TORONTO, CANADA According to the Family Business Institute, only 30% of Family Business organizations last into the second generation, 12% remain viable into the third, and 3% operate into the fourth generation or beyond.

Family businesses face major challenges in working through ownership and management succession and family business leaders acknowledge the problem. However, few know where and how to develop a Governance and Succession plan. Let me continue part 2 of the article.

b. The Romero Group, a Philippine conglomerate with interests in construction and port services, got thrown into a turmoil when the son allegedly refused to cede control of the port business to his father. This led to a volley of court cases filed between them amid allegations of fraud, betrayal and financial improprieties. The son was a co-faculty at the ATENEO Graduate School of Business in the late 90’s and the father, a colleague in another business association. Common friends asked me to intervene but it was too late. The lawyers were already swapping accusations and the courts ended up taking over jurisdiction over the brewing conflict.

c. Another Philippine company is Manila Cosmos Aerated Factory, a beverage company started by Wong Ning in 1918 and successfully steered by the second generation only to fail in the third generation due to the sudden death of the patriarch and the lack of succession planning. This led to a power struggle between the uncles and the cousins ending with a sell-out to the RFM Group. Cosmos would have celebrated their 100th year next year. The third generation leader, Prof Danny is one of W+B’s Family Business advisor.

d. Family conflict is universal. In the US, the New England grocery chain Market Basket faced six weeks of mounting employee protests losing a hefty $583 million in sales as two cousins-both grandsons of the founder—publicly and bitterly fought for control of the company. The employees refuse to follow the directives of the newly installed CEO after removing his cousin Arthur T. Demoulas.  With pressure coming to a head, the feud ended with Arthur T, initiating a buyout and reclaiming his old post as CEO of Market Basket.

I have written in my column successful cases of family owned businesses overcoming hardship and triumphantly extending the founders legacy (Eu Yan Sang, Royal Selangor).

Visionaries need not go through the same periods of adversity.To preserve their wealth, theymust initiate governance and succession at the onset and not when they are old, sickly and dying.

Imagine the benefit, if the company mastered the art and science of governance, people management, leadership development, and succession practices?

Imagine the enormous rewards, if governance is reinforced with a shared vision supported with powerful values that the founder passed on to the next generation.

Imagine legacy-building benefits, if the founder put in motion the training of the next generation leaders so they can wholeheartedly embrace the value of fairness and meritocracy and the importance of making decisions based on “what is good for the company”.

The real challenge is to make every family member and future stakeholders understand early on the all-important concept of stewardship rather than ownership.

How? By learning from the best in their class… large family-owned businesses and their leaders that have defied the odds, went through rough patches in the second generation, summoned extraordinary strength to set things right, and deftly overcoming the third generation curse. They continue to prosper with some becoming certified century-old organizations.

Governance and Succession is non-negotiable. It is your wonderful gift to the next generation!

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

 

138 years of murder, sellout, buyout, growth

THE Eu Yan Sang Group is one inspiring family enterprise and undoubtedly deserves to be in the top spot of my Family Business Longevity Series because of the resiliency and resolve of the fourth generation members to regain control, where they ended up owning the majority shares after engineering a buyout from an outsider/investor.

It is a classic “stalls to stars to almost stalls and back to stars” turnaround story!

According to an account by Rachel Cheung in the South China Post, “despite years of family strife, the murder of the founder’s wife by her brothers-in-law and a takeover by a Singapore investment group, traditional Chinese medicine maker Eu Yan Sang has survived and flourished as a Hong Kong icon.”

Founded in 1879, Eu Yan Sang is Asia’s leading brand in the healthcare industry, with a core focus on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). They market quality Chinese herbs, Chinese Proprietary Medicines, as well as health foods and supplements, offering more than 900 products under the Eu Yan Sang brand and sub-brands plus over 1,000 different types of Chinese herbs and other medicinal products.

The company’s ability to control the total supply chain enabled it to expand across Singapore with more than 50 retail outlets in major shopping malls and residential estates.

Overcoming years of strife and betrayal, the Eu Yan Sang Group is celebrating its 138th anniversary this year. It is now being run by the fourth-generation family members headed by the savvy and daring Richard Eu, two cousins together with institutional shareholder Temasek Holdings & Tower Capital.

In the 1870s, founder Eu Kong Pai, better known as Eu Kong, left the village of Foshan in Guangdong, China and settled down in the small mining town of Gopeng, Perak (now Malaysia). After failed ventures in a bakery and a textile dyeing business, Eu joined thousands of Chinese miners on a tin rush and noticed that his fellow mine workers were heavily dependent on opium as the easiest method for immediate relief for their medical needs.

He decided to start selling traditional Chinese herbal medicine using the ancient recipes that had been passed down through Chinese culture. Eu Kong opened his first Chinese medicine shop in 1879 in Gopeng.

In a 2009 biography by Ilsa Sharp about his son, Eu Tong Sen, the father was pictured as a savvy entrepreneur, acquiring land that was rich in tin deposits. Eu Kong eventually became a prominent businessman, supported by his second wife Mun Woon Chang, a well-connected Nyonya (female Malacca Strait-born Chinese).

The book also recounted that Eu’s success was short-lived. A disease suspected as smallpox, claimed his life at the age of 37. All his possessions went to Mun, triggering the envy of his two gambling addict brothers, who murdered her by lacing the family dinner with poison during a visit to China.

Sixteen-year-old Eu Tong Sen, who inherited his father’s business, narrowly escaped death himself. Toughened by the traumas of his early life, he went on to become one of the richest men in Southeast Asia in the early 20th century, owning tin mines, rubber plantations, properties and even a bank.

To be continued…

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

Only One Child Inherits (Last Part)

NAIROBI, KENYA. We have all heard about the 3rd generation curse and are familiar with the grim statistics that only 3% of all family-owned corporations make it into the fourth generation.

I am in Nairobi now for a week-long World Bank/IFC mission to promote corporate governance amongst East Africa’s aggressive family owned enterprises and I would frequently challenge business leaders to ponder on the unique Japanese approach to longevity especially for the Toraya Group.

Five hundred years later, Toraya continues to stand tall above other family owned enterprises with the current proprietor belonging to the 17th generation, ably supported by the next in line successor-son Kurokawa Mitsuharu.

How did the family business managed to navigate the business amidst an emotion-driven enterprise where family relationships always come first over business?

The “ie” concept, unique only to Japanese family business community immediately comes to life.

Non-existent to the western world, the concept in a patrilineal household, is at the core of the traditional Japanese family and is based on a forefather or primogenitor model.

In this ecosystem, only one child inherits. All of the other children in any generation are expected to eventually leave the family and go on to establish themselves in some other institution. The chosen successor, usually the eldest son, inherits the family and everything to do with the family, and the rest of the children have to find their own way in the world.

In theory, the “ie” should last forever and in principle never dies. Japanese culture plays down the role of the individual and places significance on the importance of conformity and the success of the group.

The primary objective of an “ie” is to preserve the clan. Therefore, it entails: (1) long-term planning, (2) priority to market share, rather than profit, (3) weak shareholder position, (4) resisting mergers and acquisitions, and (5) displaying, even more, strength in the face of adversity.

Since the company should last forever, a Japanese family business based on the “ie” principle will have very few disturbances from misalignment or possible frictions between the different family circles.

The Chairman/CEO and head of the “ie” is usually in full control and the family is programmed to support him in any possible way.

In case there are no children or the offspring of the owning family is not willing or capable to fill the position, the head of the “ie” can rope in an outsider via adoption.

This centuries-old adult adoption practice in Japan was developed as a mechanism for families to extend their family name, estate and ancestry without an unwieldy reliance on bloodlines.  The Chairman/ CEO of the “ie” can substitute his own bloodline with a competent person that he likes.

By choosing a “mini-me” he can ensure the survival of the business and bar incompetent heirs from ruining the family lineage. The effect is twofold: (1) his own children will be much more aligned to the overall business goals; (2) he signals to his employees or talent pool that they also have a theoretical chance to make it big.

It is the unwritten spirit of “ie” and truly lived unity that is powerful. Written agreements are important, but worthless if the core “ie” does not exist.

This addresses the question why Japan has 7 out of the 10 oldest companies on the planet and also has the highest concentration of old family businesses by any measure such as GDP, population, and land mass.

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

The Heart of a 500 Year Old Family Business (Part 2)

In Toraya’s English webpage, the first clearly documented reference to Toraya is an existing temple records from 1600. There are also records dated September 15, 1635 that provide a glimpse into the company’s business at the time of proprietor Enchu Kurokawa’s death. I will walk the reader and articulate each of Toraya’s longevity principles as manifested in their 500 years of existence.

No. 1 It Is Important to Focus on the Present

Toraya’s current president, Kurokawa Mitsuhiro, the seventeenth to take the helm, does not spend too much time dwelling on his company’s illustrious past.  Kurokawa believes focus on what needs to be done now, rather than simply following the ways of the past, is what has kept Toraya in business all these years and also allowed it to preserve many of its traditions.

According to him, “It’s mere hindsight for us to ponder why Toraya has been around for so long.  What’s important is not the past or even the future, but the present. It comes down to doing what needs to be done to create the sort of sweets that customers will like.”

This flexibility may have something to do with the fact that there are no set-in-stone Kurokawa “family precepts” to be passed down from father to son. When Kurokawa Mitsuhiro took over from his own father, back in 1991, he realized the freedom and responsibility that came with the position: “Since there were no precepts, it was basically: Do what you like—it’s all up to you now.”

Thus, Kurokawa asserts that choice, not circumstances, determines success.  As Geoffrey Gaberino, 1984 Olympic Gold Medalist says, “The real contest is always between what you’ve done and what you’re  capable of doing.  You measure yourself against yourself and nobody else.”

It might sound overly simplistic, but if you’re going to sell something successfully, it better be worth the price tag.  This is another longevity formula for success that the Toraya Company holds on to.

No. 2 The Goal is to Be Relevant And Authentic

Temple records dated September 15, 1635 showed a list of 20 types of confectionery that Toraya (literally, “tiger store”)  served to the Empress Meisho on the occasion of her visit to her father’s court of retirement.  In 2003, the company opened its first Toraya Café in the fashionable Roppongi Hills building in Tokyo, featuring a lineup of sweets that combine elements of wagashi and Western confectioneries to create a whole new taste category.

The company’s effort to cultivate a taste for wagashi is not limited to overseas; it is also doing its utmost to foster demand among Japan’s younger generation, which has become more familiar with European-style confectionaries than home-grown ones.

No. 3 Product Centric

Matsudaira Naritada, head of Toraya’s Public Relations Division, explains that the firm is always developing new namagashi and other sweets—a process that takes around three years for each item. But Toraya only introduces a sweet once it has complete confidence in the new creation—without relying on customer feedback along the way to make adjustments.

Because the namgashi lineup is always changing, including the appearance of brand-new items, each visit to a Toraya shop promises a novel encounter. And the items selected have a connection to the particular time of the year, both in their design and in the ingredients they contain.

To be continued…

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

A 500-year old Family Business (Part 1)

What make some family businesses go on for centuries while others succumb and die early? My quest for corporate longevity continues.

In my last article, I glowingly talk about Lee Kum Kee’s 129 year run where they defied the third-generation curse but on the one hand, I have also written numerous articles about the 3rd generation curse and have highlighted statistics that only 3% of all family-owned corporations make it into the fourth generation.

In an insightful research material by Schwartz and Bergfeld, the authors pointed to one country that seemed to challenge the 3rd generation curse much better than others.

Japan has 7 out of the 10 oldest companies on the planet and also has the highest concentration of old family businesses by any measure such as GDP, population, and landmass. According to a 2008 study from the Bank of Korea, the world had 5,586 companies that were older than 200 years. In the same study, Japan was number one with 3,146 firms or 56 percent; the second was Germany with 837 or 15 percent; the Netherlands came third with 222 and fourth was France with 196 companies.

But it is not only the extreme cases of very old companies that are surprising, the overall life expectancy of a Japanese family business is higher in general. According to Professor Toshio Goto from the Japan University of Economics in Tokyo, the average lifetime of a Japanese family business in 2005 was 52 years, more than double that of its American counterparts.  What can the unique Japanese approach teach us about longevity?

If family businesses from around the globe strive for future prosperity and family survival in an increasingly volatile, complex and ambiguous world, how does a tradition-rich company like Japan’s Toraya Confectionery Company managed to keep pace with an ever-changing world?  Even with a great idea, thorough research and hours and hours of hard work, one rule still applies:  Nothing is certain in life and in business.  No one can unfailingly know if one will fail or succeed in life, how investors will receive a startup idea or whether a company will survive past the one-year mark.  So, how can one increase the odds of, well, beating the odds?

It’s a question asked often enough that it deserves an answer.

Toraya Confectionery Co. Ltd. is a Japanese confectionery company founded by  Enchu Kurokawa in early 16th century, Kyoto.   Toraya, a maker of wagashi (traditional Japanese confections), was a supplier to the imperial court during the reign of Emperor Goyozei, which was from 1586 to 1611. Toraya established a foothold in Tokyo in 1869, after the national capital was transferred there on the heels of the Meiji Restoration. At present, Toraya has three factories and approximately 80 shops throughout Japan, in addition to a boutique in Paris.

Running a business for almost 500 years is not without challenges, mainly in the form of disasters, change in society, economic transformation and several World War upheavals and Toraya  countered by shifting from being the imperial family’s purveyor to opening retails stores.

Steve Jobs once said, “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backward.”   Even the Great Confucius explained that if we want to define the future, we have to study the past.  And so, let us study Toraya’s history for the past 500 years.  Indeed, for a small start-up company, to last this long is a testimony to its great history. Since its inception, Toraya has grown big and evolved into a well respected corporate venture that has become known in Japan, the rest of Asia Pacific, and the world.

To be continued….

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)