Tag Archives: leadership transition

The 70/30 Succession Curse

The month of May has been quite challenging. An ugly feud erupted for control of a family-owned business in country A and I have been requested to intervene.

The sons of the founder are attempting to wrest control of the company from their father. Several thousand miles away in country B, another scenario has befallen another company, this time pitting siblings against siblings after the sudden demise of the matriarch. In both cases, my intervention posthaste was due to recommendations from associates that felt there was still a glimmer of hope for mediation.

The caveat is that should my initiatives fail in the next 12 months; a litigious process pitting lawyers from both sides will ensue. I can almost anticipate a very public mud-throwing spectacle between the warring parties much like the Lotte Group conflict in South Korea and the Philippine’s Ilusorio and Romero family disputes.

In my initial research, the problems started manifesting when the children were forced to join the business without any clarity related to their roles and responsibilities. After the ownership structure was distributed to the children, the plot to unseat their father intensified. I cannot pass judgment nor speculate on the motivation of the four siblings why they rebelled against their father. One thing is clear –– the issues are deep-seated and have created so much strain on the family. The children are now in their early 40’s.

Theoretically, I refer to the first case as rebellious. It is one of the three patterns of ineffective succession where the next generation launches a clean slate approach to the organization as an overreaction to the founder’s control of the firm. As a result, traditions, legacies and even the business model are rejected and discarded.

This case is just one of a handful of unwarranted family squabbles where the children would attempt to dislodge their parents from controlling the companies that the older generation founded. Predictably, these conflicts implode when governance, succession and ownership processes are set aside. And these same type of issues can happen to any family owning business, big and small.

As a family business advisor, I have never been remiss in constantly reminding leaders to initiate the process of succession immediately. Unfortunately, procrastination, an air of invincibility (superman mentality) and an inflated ego can oftentimes obfuscate the founder’s rational mindset.

The facts are clear, seventy percent of wealth and ownership transitions are not successful and seventy percent of family wealth ends with the 3rd generation.

So I am posing a direct challenge to family business owners: Be among the thirty percent who have successfully transitioned their wealth and ownership to the next generation.

One of the worst mistakes entrepreneurs can make is to postpone naming a successor until just before they are ready to step down or when death comes knocking.

Sometimes founders avoid naming successors because they don’t want to hurt family members who are not chosen to succeed them.  Yet, both the business and the family will be better off if, after evaluating the candidates as they work in the business, the founder picks the successor based on that person’s skills and abilities, early enough.

So my advice to business owners in their 60’s and 70’s is to have an open mind on the topic of succession planning. It can be both exciting and daunting at the same time. Daunting as the “letting go” phase for someone else to take over can be initially tough on founders. However, for visionaries dreaming of perpetuating their businesses, they must recognize that this leadership transition is both critical and indispensable.

esoriano@wongadvisory.com  

 

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Nothing is Certain Except Death

It is a Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous (VUCA) world out there! I am constrained to add that on top of the uncertainty of business, the demise of a family business leader can cripple the enterprise overnight.

The sudden death of a colleague in 2015 was a stark reminder that life is fleeting.

A year earlier, we were exchanging notes and quite excited about our planned collaboration to “gain a beach head” by setting up businesses in emerging ASEAN member economies. Then suddenly, I received news that he became terminally ill and given a few months to live… six months to be exact. In a blink of an eye, his health deteriorated and went downhill. He was gone at 64. Death came so swiftly like a thief in the night. He left behind a wife, three children and a 2,700 plus workforce.

My friend passed away without preparing any leadership transition and as the family grieved, the children struggled to consolidate his estate comprising assets, liabilities including the three core businesses. And as if on cue, worried creditors swooped down like vultures, naturally demanding for answers on how loans will be repaid.

For the three children (all in their 30’s), they were obviously unprepared, untrained and used to the good life generously provided for by their visionary father. With the death of the patriarch, they were now fearful of an uncertain future and the “what’s next”. I realized that the family needed help so I volunteered any assistance but my offer was politely turned down.

When the youngest child was diagnosed with a certain form of mental disorder and had to be hospitalized, the other siblings continued to manage the business but their apparent lack of training and limited skills worsened the situation. Sensing a bleak future, employees started to leave the company.

The business suffered its biggest setback when their credit lines were discontinued. Clearly, everyone where at a loss due to the sudden void left by the demise of their leader.

Four months after, the children pleaded for help and requested my intervention.

The six months that followed was probably one of the most challenging times the family members experienced under my brand of governance… and a test of patience for me and my team as well. I almost gave up on a number of occasions. The family members were stubborn, indecisive, arrogant and distrustful of our turnaround initiatives. Worse, they were incredulous and hardly contributed to the efforts.

I felt helpless when they could not decide on critical issues and in my quiet moments I would lay the blame on their deceased father for overprotecting and raising entitled children. Their actions were extremely frustrating and a disservice to the values of hard work and tenacity that the father displayed when he was alive.

At the onset, the only way to appease troublesome creditors was to install a management committee primarily tasked to manage a tight cash flow.  We also brought in specialists to “hold the fort” until the situation normalized. My title was “caretaker CEO” but in reality I played a conductor role by making sure alignment of plans continued without disruption.

After 2 years of playing catch up, the firefighting became less frequent and the business showed signs of recovery.  When we finally saw steady growth, we knew a turnaround was in sight. We also saw creditors renewing their commitments after cash flow and new investments were already showing favorable results.

It was a close call and for year three (2018) to five, the enterprise is now geared for growth and expansion.