Tag Archives: Family Business Coach

Family Businesses Must Aspire to Reach 100 years (Part 1)

ayala.png

Ayala Corporation

Ayala Corporation is the holding company of one of the oldest and largest business groups in the Philippines. Ayala has leadership positions in real estate, financial services, telecommunications, water infrastructure, electronics manufacturing, automotive distributorship and dealership, and business process outsourcing, and new investments in power generation, transport infrastructure, and education.

Year started: 1834

Number of Employees: 35,073

Annual Sales: $4,194.97M (2016)

Net Income: $547.74M (2016)

In a disclosure to the Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE) on Friday, August 11, AC reported a net income of P15.1 billion for January to June this year, compared to the P13.8 billion in the same period in 2016.

“A journey of a thousand li starts beneath one’s feet” is a common saying that originated from a famous Chinese proverb. The “starts beneath one’s feet” in family business parlance is governance. And governance is all about rules, policies, systems and accountability. In short governance is all about institutionalizing control and decision making.  As the 8th Generation successor, Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala, Chair of Ayala Corporation puts it…

“It is important to teach each new generation, early on, the difference between ownership and stewardship. Ownership is a right of possession. Stewardship is a fiduciary role. It is holding the institution in ‘trust for’ the next generation. We feel, as a family, that this institution has been passed on to us for our care and not for us to dissipate or do what we will with it for our personal gain.”

Ayala Corporation (AC) was founded in 1834 and is the oldest family business in the Philippines. That makes AC 183 years old.

Governance is uppermost in everybody’s mind today. But governance can be a difficult and extremely challenging act for family business owners.

According to a PWC report, “no matter what their size, the unique—and often volatile—mix of personal family dynamics, business strategy and ownership criteria can create an emotionally charged environment that makes decision-making, not to mention day-to-day management, challenging. And as the founding generation ages, succession and power issues across an expanding family can create cascading concerns.”

In my previous articles, I narrated a number of highly successful Family enterprises in Asia and researched on their history as well as their transformation as Asia’s gold standard in governance and succession. Without any doubt, these companies exhibited remarkable parallelism worth sharing over and over again.

What made these businesses tick? What were the qualities of the leaders that made them endure family tension, betrayal, adversity and conflict? Was it pure luck that they overcame a bitter feud? What was their secret to longevity?

It is a fact that all family businesses struggle with governance and succession with some even facing untold hardship and survival. Take the case of the Eu Yan Sang Family Business that was established in the late 1870’s.

Before the fourth-generation Eu family members engineered a buyout what was originally their family business, the family had to endure a tumultuous period starting with the murder of the wife of the successor by her in laws in the second-generation, an escalating conflict in the third generation with 13 uncles fighting for the spoils of the businesses and a volatile fourth generation involving 72 cousins.

If not for the daring move of the fourth-generation cousins led by investment banker Richard Eu, who engineered a buyout, Eu Yan Sang would have ended in their generation. With rules in place, Eu Yan Sang is now managed by a combination of fourth-generation descendants and professional managers and the growth has been phenomenal.

It is also noteworthy to consider some high-profile families in Asia that got embroiled in senseless and unnecessary conflict. For many, they ended in failure. For some, they were able to overcome the bitter rivalry and went on to strengthen their organizations.  I have compiled a handful of cases involving conflicts so owners, who are currently feeling the tension pervading within the family and the business, will realize the need to seek immediate intervention from family experts.

a. Mayfull Foods Corporation of Taiwan by far is the most violent and tragic family conflict recorded in Taiwan and probably in Asia. Gunshots rang out after a regular corporate meeting where the topic of inheritance was being discussed. Six brothers of the late tycoon Huang Jung-tu were present. The shooting resulted in the death of the two brothers. When the police arrived, the gunman ended up killing himself before falling from the 7th floor of their company’s headquarters. In one fell swoop, three brothers ended up dead in what police investigators called a pre meditated murder-suicide.

To be continued…

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

 

Rise, Fall and Rise of the EYS Family Business

Asian giant Eu Yan Sang (EYS) International is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) provider. The company was established in the late 1870s and has been in operation for 138 years. It is managed by a combination of fourth-generation descendants and professional managers.

This article highlights the complex nature of family businesses and the even more complex and often unwieldy interplay of preserving family values, managing sibling rivalries, personality differences, and reviving a century old business using modern management techniques.

Adding to the 100 year old drama that almost imperiled the business was the murder of Eu Tong Sen’s wife by his brothers, the sellout to an outside investor and the repurchase by the fourth generation members giving back control of the business to family.

Growing the Family Business

In an interview by NUS adjunct Prof Alison Eyring, she asked Richard Eu, the great grandson who led the buyout for his advice to leaders who want to grow a family business…

“Every generation, you’ve got to think what you want to do with the family business. Is your business the right business for the future? Is it more important to preserve the family or more important to preserve the business? That’s a discussion that you’ve got to have within the family and there’s many different parts to this. The family must have ongoing conversations about its future. This isn’t just about the patriarch or the founder – it’s got to include everybody.”

The entry of the fourth generation was a period of ups and downs but would end up as Eu San Sang’s defining moment.

Sell out due to 10 Uncles and 72 Cousins

In one newspaper account, Richard persuaded the board to make him general manager in 1989. But he ended up running  into a brick wall when the clan, comprising of mostly extended family members that included 10 uncles and aunts and 72 cousins, did not support him.

Instead, they sold their shares to the construction company Lum Chang. For the latter, it was a just an opportunistic investment in taking over the company.

Despite losing control, Richard navigated the company to steady growth, with the launch of a breakthrough product, American Ginseng Tea in 1991. The year after, the company listed in the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.

Four years later, Richard Eu and two of his cousins engineered a buy out of Lum Chang’s shares in EYS Holdings – making the firm a family business once again.

Back to Being a Family Business

Expansion went full-blast in Hong Kong, with its facility receiving ISO certification. In the coming years, the company achieved one milestone after another. The company would also end up becoming the majority stockholder of Australian health giant Healthzone.

With the company pursuing online automation for quality control, it aggressively expanded to more than 300 stores and clinics across four continents with $230 million in sales.

Growth and Expansion

Richard acknowledges that professionals are necessary in a huge enterprise, but he once told Asia Society that non-family managers tend to think short-term rather than long-term. For him, family is still paramount.

Since it was publicly listed in 2000, Eu Yan Sang has delivered double digit growth. In its core markets of Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong – the business enjoys the largest market share in its sector.

Many thanks to the participants of my Family Constitution seminar (Manila Series) last Saturday at the Tower Club in Makati as well as the participants who attended my talk in Jakarta the week before. These talks are extremely important for business owners in their quest to create a lasting legacy for their enterprises.

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

Only One Child Inherits (Last Part)

NAIROBI, KENYA. We have all heard about the 3rd generation curse and are familiar with the grim statistics that only 3% of all family-owned corporations make it into the fourth generation.

I am in Nairobi now for a week-long World Bank/IFC mission to promote corporate governance amongst East Africa’s aggressive family owned enterprises and I would frequently challenge business leaders to ponder on the unique Japanese approach to longevity especially for the Toraya Group.

Five hundred years later, Toraya continues to stand tall above other family owned enterprises with the current proprietor belonging to the 17th generation, ably supported by the next in line successor-son Kurokawa Mitsuharu.

How did the family business managed to navigate the business amidst an emotion-driven enterprise where family relationships always come first over business?

The “ie” concept, unique only to Japanese family business community immediately comes to life.

Non-existent to the western world, the concept in a patrilineal household, is at the core of the traditional Japanese family and is based on a forefather or primogenitor model.

In this ecosystem, only one child inherits. All of the other children in any generation are expected to eventually leave the family and go on to establish themselves in some other institution. The chosen successor, usually the eldest son, inherits the family and everything to do with the family, and the rest of the children have to find their own way in the world.

In theory, the “ie” should last forever and in principle never dies. Japanese culture plays down the role of the individual and places significance on the importance of conformity and the success of the group.

The primary objective of an “ie” is to preserve the clan. Therefore, it entails: (1) long-term planning, (2) priority to market share, rather than profit, (3) weak shareholder position, (4) resisting mergers and acquisitions, and (5) displaying, even more, strength in the face of adversity.

Since the company should last forever, a Japanese family business based on the “ie” principle will have very few disturbances from misalignment or possible frictions between the different family circles.

The Chairman/CEO and head of the “ie” is usually in full control and the family is programmed to support him in any possible way.

In case there are no children or the offspring of the owning family is not willing or capable to fill the position, the head of the “ie” can rope in an outsider via adoption.

This centuries-old adult adoption practice in Japan was developed as a mechanism for families to extend their family name, estate and ancestry without an unwieldy reliance on bloodlines.  The Chairman/ CEO of the “ie” can substitute his own bloodline with a competent person that he likes.

By choosing a “mini-me” he can ensure the survival of the business and bar incompetent heirs from ruining the family lineage. The effect is twofold: (1) his own children will be much more aligned to the overall business goals; (2) he signals to his employees or talent pool that they also have a theoretical chance to make it big.

It is the unwritten spirit of “ie” and truly lived unity that is powerful. Written agreements are important, but worthless if the core “ie” does not exist.

This addresses the question why Japan has 7 out of the 10 oldest companies on the planet and also has the highest concentration of old family businesses by any measure such as GDP, population, and land mass.

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

A 500-year old Family Business (Part 1)

What make some family businesses go on for centuries while others succumb and die early? My quest for corporate longevity continues.

In my last article, I glowingly talk about Lee Kum Kee’s 129 year run where they defied the third-generation curse but on the one hand, I have also written numerous articles about the 3rd generation curse and have highlighted statistics that only 3% of all family-owned corporations make it into the fourth generation.

In an insightful research material by Schwartz and Bergfeld, the authors pointed to one country that seemed to challenge the 3rd generation curse much better than others.

Japan has 7 out of the 10 oldest companies on the planet and also has the highest concentration of old family businesses by any measure such as GDP, population, and landmass. According to a 2008 study from the Bank of Korea, the world had 5,586 companies that were older than 200 years. In the same study, Japan was number one with 3,146 firms or 56 percent; the second was Germany with 837 or 15 percent; the Netherlands came third with 222 and fourth was France with 196 companies.

But it is not only the extreme cases of very old companies that are surprising, the overall life expectancy of a Japanese family business is higher in general. According to Professor Toshio Goto from the Japan University of Economics in Tokyo, the average lifetime of a Japanese family business in 2005 was 52 years, more than double that of its American counterparts.  What can the unique Japanese approach teach us about longevity?

If family businesses from around the globe strive for future prosperity and family survival in an increasingly volatile, complex and ambiguous world, how does a tradition-rich company like Japan’s Toraya Confectionery Company managed to keep pace with an ever-changing world?  Even with a great idea, thorough research and hours and hours of hard work, one rule still applies:  Nothing is certain in life and in business.  No one can unfailingly know if one will fail or succeed in life, how investors will receive a startup idea or whether a company will survive past the one-year mark.  So, how can one increase the odds of, well, beating the odds?

It’s a question asked often enough that it deserves an answer.

Toraya Confectionery Co. Ltd. is a Japanese confectionery company founded by  Enchu Kurokawa in early 16th century, Kyoto.   Toraya, a maker of wagashi (traditional Japanese confections), was a supplier to the imperial court during the reign of Emperor Goyozei, which was from 1586 to 1611. Toraya established a foothold in Tokyo in 1869, after the national capital was transferred there on the heels of the Meiji Restoration. At present, Toraya has three factories and approximately 80 shops throughout Japan, in addition to a boutique in Paris.

Running a business for almost 500 years is not without challenges, mainly in the form of disasters, change in society, economic transformation and several World War upheavals and Toraya  countered by shifting from being the imperial family’s purveyor to opening retails stores.

Steve Jobs once said, “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backward.”   Even the Great Confucius explained that if we want to define the future, we have to study the past.  And so, let us study Toraya’s history for the past 500 years.  Indeed, for a small start-up company, to last this long is a testimony to its great history. Since its inception, Toraya has grown big and evolved into a well respected corporate venture that has become known in Japan, the rest of Asia Pacific, and the world.

To be continued….

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

Rule No. 3 No Extra Marital Affairs

The rule definitely appears controversial and has raised many eyebrows every time I introduce the topic during Family Governance talks. Even my best friend who is a second-generation Chinese family member weighed in on the rule that it is very “un-Chinese”.  I leave the readers to interpret what my Chinese friend said.

Lee Kum Kee Policies

But for the 129-year-old Lee Kum Kee Group, the family edict related to extra marital affairs is one of the most powerful rules that the third generation and grandson of the founder, Lee Man-tat has required the next generation shareholders to obey especially those sitting on the board.

There are equally unique and governance rules that Lee Man-tat espoused as well and these are:

Rule No 1: No Late Marriage

Rule No 2: No Divorce

Rule No 3: No Extra Marital Affairs

Any family board member who contravenes Rules No. 2 and No. 3 are expected and required to leave the board automatically and will no longer have the right to speak and participate in the family council and business decision-making process.

Family Constitution and Family Council in 2002

For Lee Man Tat, these rules are important and crucial as the family members have grown in size, some have lost personal interest in the business, the market environment has become complicated, shareholder ownership are dispersed and owners have varying versions of where the future is headed.

After weathering through two major corporate battles, the Lees agreed to finally set up a family council and draft a family constitution in 2002.

In an article penned by Jeff Pao, he highlighted the different corporate governance systems set up by LKK and what came out of the initiatives, most notable was organizing the Family Council Board and the roles of the 29-member family assembly.

Pao further contends that the family council is in charge of the family business, family office, family investment firm, family charity fund and family training center.

I will share more initiatives that the Lee Kum Kee incorporated in their Family Constitution:

a. All family members have to work at least three to five years in other companies after graduating from college if they want to join the family business

b. Family members who violate rules do not just defy the values enshrined in their Family Charter but will also lose their moral and business ascendancy to implement, enforce and discipline erring or wayward family members.

c. Another powerful value worth repeating in this article is their strong adherence to “Si Li Ji Ren“, a Mandarin saying meaning “Put Other’s First, before yourself.”

d. If family members quit the board or company for personal reasons, they can sell their shares to the company and remain as family council members

e. The next generation are allowed to inherit shares even if they are not involved in the daily business operations.

These rules are the heart and soul of Lee Kum Kee’s flourishing existence and the foundation of their commitment to pursue business excellence and stewardship so the business can be handed to the next generation seamlessly.

Lee Kum is the name of the founder, and Kee is a Chinese word that means a new family business.

The enterprise will be celebrating 130 years in 2018 and there are no signs of the group slowing down. On top of their strict observance of protocols, the other critical and indispensable governance rule that the Lee family initiated was formalizing their succession plan.

The family believes that the plan is critical to sustaining a long-lasting family business.

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

The Lee Kum Kee Family Secret

Hong Kong sauce giant Lee KumKee Group is one of a handful of Chinese family owned enterprises in the world that has not only managed to survived for more than a century but has thrived after 129 years of steadfastly holding on to some unique and time tested values reinforced with a powerful succession plan model.

Established in 1888, the Lee KumKee group has a remarkable history built over five generations. Yet, despite its market leadership and being a world-renowned brand offering an assortment of Chinese sauces, the group has not been spared of her share of family conflict as a result of business disagreements and buyouts.

Major Shocks

In 1972, the third generation heir, Lee Man-tat and grandson of the founder suggested to its shareholders the importance of creating additional product lines for its oyster sauce business to reach a bigger market. But the idea did not sit well with his uncles, so the following year and with the backing from his father, Lee Man-tat ended up buying all the shares of the company.

Another setback happened in 1986 when Lee Man-tat proposed the idea of expanding the factory but ended up being rebuffed by his younger sibling who at that time owned 40 percent of the business. Due to differences in management style, Lee Man-tat offered to buy his brother’s shares.

After going through these two major corporate hiccups, Lee Man-tat ended up gaining control of the business. His five children then joined the company one after another.

The two shocks made the Lee family realized the vulnerability of the enterprise to internal conflicts, so in 2002, the family agreed to set up a family council and draft a family constitution.

Family First, Business Second

The core value of Lee KumKee is “family first, business second,” there other values according to writer Alan Lee Ka-Fai that are worth emulating by family business owners and these are the following:

a. Entrepreneurship is Key: The family requires the successors to stay as entrepreneurs as “it does not believe one would succeed in keeping the business without instant innovation and thinking out of the box.” The family business will not be able to stay on long unless it always maintains the mindset of entrepreneurs.

b. Governance System must be in Place: Apart from family values, the family constitution and family council are two key elements of family governance. These elements would help build trust among family members and cement family ties.

c. The family motto also underlines achieving a win-win situation

Additionally, I have included some of the powerful values I mentioned in my article last week namely:

d. Put Other’s First, before yourself

e. Pragmatism

f. Integrity and

g. Benefiting the community

According to Dr. Amen Lee, President of Legacy Academy, developing a long-term vision is a key element. He goes on to espouse the five dimensions that includes the practice of family values, continuation of family relationship, passing on of family knowledge, management of family wealth and succession of family business.

Inevitably, for family enterprises aspiring to become legacy bearers, the key is to pass on the values of the first-generation entrepreneurs, including their core concepts and life wisdom.

For writer Allan Lee Ka-fai, he concluded that “Family businesses which have lasted more than 100 years usually have a very unique understanding of family, business and relationships, and pass it on to the next generation as the family legacy.”

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

Are Business Owners Doing It Right? (Part 2)

  • Do you think your children are dedicated in pursuing business continuity?
  • Are your children qualified to assume leadership roles?
  • Do you have rules for in-law participation?
  • Have you already identified a successor?
  • Do you have a succession plan in place?
  • Do you honestly believe your eldest child is the most qualified? 
  • Are your children entitled? Were there rules when they joined the business?
  • Did you require them to work outside the family business before joining?
  • Are you compensating your children commensurate to their skills and annual performance?
  • Does an HR policies cover family members? Does your HR Manager have the power to discipline family members?
  • Have you established criteria for family members owning shares? For selling shares? Assigning shares? Encumbering shares? Selling to siblings or other branches?

If you answered “NO” to just a handful of the questions above, sadly your family and the business may be headed to a bruising conflict.

If you sense the undercurrents and tensions building amongst family members now, it is wise not to disregard them. As their leader, do your family a big favor, fix the problem. If you cannot fix it, find someone who has the competence, experience and objectivity to help.

Let me take this opportunity to say that this extremely sensitive subject will be highlighted and discussed in my one day workshop in Cebu on Saturday, May 20 at City Sports Club.

The simmering tensions are telltale signs of a “baby elephant in the room”. Ignore these issues and the family and business will suffer. You might think that these issues will heal over time. It will not. As a matter of fact, the conflict will manifest in many forms and through time, implodes as you start losing your grip of the business due to advancing age or when you are no longer around to make important decisions.

It is obviously clear that these problems surfaced many years ago and you brushed them aside. These problems relate to entitlement, sibling rivalry, generational conflict, conflicting interest, in law and cousin participation.

When you procrastinate, the problems are magnified, emotions takes center stage, entropy pervades and battle lines are drawn.

Emotion and entitlement

At this juncture, legal intervention assumes a more active role and my capacity and influence as a family business coach diminishes. As family business advisor, our governance intervention is more effective if lawyers are kept out of the conflict.

Immediately right after helplessly watching his children bitterly fought for ownership and control of the business he started 50 years ago, a client confided to me:

“Prof, I failed as a parent. How I wished I were poor again. I never expected that the wealth I created has cause so much pain and misery amongst my children…we used to live simple lives but things have changed, all because of greed and pride!”.

If I hasten to add, emotion and entitlement remained as aggravating circumstances to any conflict.

With no policies in place, it will be overwhelmingly tough for the family to move forward in one direction.

I can go on and on with more nagging questions but inarguably, it will still reflect on the most fundamental question for family business owners…

“Are you doing it right? If you think you are not doing enough to ensure your legacy, do you plan to urgently do something to create harmony amongst family members?”

It is not too late though. There is still time to do something right but you must start the process now!

(esoriano@wongadvisory.com)

*****

Prof Soriano is slated to deliver a talk to family business owners in Cebu on May 20, 2017. The talk this month is part of W+B Cebu’s advocacy campaign related to Family and Business Governance. Seats are limited. Those interested to reserve a slot may call Octopus Events at 09159108686 and look for Ms. Cherryl.