Tag Archives: Entry and exit rules

Ensuring 100 Years of Unity and Growth Part 1

What comprises natural conflict?

I’ll start with the most pressing issues that are regularly amplified in my governance engagements in Asia.

Generational transition and the ensuing conflict between generations can cause irreversible damage to relationships. All too often the senior-generation leaders believe they have done a great deal in generating wealth for the next generation only to falter in the end game because the “passing of the torch” was never planned well. There is no success without succession!

Family members between generations have different values and varying degrees of personal and business goals.When these goals are not articulated in a proper forum or is not aligned with the overarching values of the family, this can transform into unnecessary stress and open the flood gates for more conflict situations.

Personalities are totally different. When ignored, set aside or worse, a bad behavior is rewarded by the business leader; this can naturally lead to intense rivalries. The result can cause severe harm not just to the business but in relationships all the way to the succeeding generations.

Family member expectations related to employment, entitlement, perks, promotions, ownership vary. These expectations must be addressed immediately. If the business leader continues to set this aside, it will negatively impact family and business harmony and challenge the long-term survival of the business.

No employment entry and exit rules. Expect regular fireworks when any family member crosses over from the family to the business without clarity. Who gets to work? Who gets what position? Promotion? Titles? Perks? In-law employment? Treatment of family member, as an employee or as an owner? When the business leader ignores these issues and does not initiate a formal employment process, your natural tendency to employ family members by virtue of bloodline can turn into a nightmare.

These are natural conflicts in family owning businesses. Every family business comprises a mixture of individuals who are more likely to hold different opinions on a particular matter. For some families, disagreements can either be strategic or tactical which is acceptable in the ordinary course of preparing your plans for the future.

But in really difficult cases, some of the conflicts I have resolved come from deep-seated resentment and anger dating back from years of indifference and neglect.

When these issues continue to be ignored or not managed, expect tension to build up causing many business failures and untold misery.

On the bright side, I have identified Asia’s oldest family-owned businesses that have breached 100 years. What are the “secrets” to their longevity? What made them overcome crisis after crisis? What made them accomplished so much?

In the Philippines, I can only count a handful of family owned businesses that are still operating today.  The most enduring of them all is the family behind the 184 year old Ayala Group of Companies. The group was founded in 1834 and is presently under the care of the 8th generation stewards, Jaime and Fernando Zobel de Ayala.

Out of a family of seven, they were both handpicked to co-lead the conglomerate. With a target EBITDA of more than US$1B this year, they must be doing something worth emulating.

Presently, three 9th generation family members are occupying positions in different industries to prepare them for future leadership. But just like ordinary employees, these young descendants have to go through the rigors of occupying entry level positions to gain the experience and think like professionals with accountability so they can earn the respect of their non-family co-employees.

To be continued…

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Dealing with a Black Sheep

I highlighted in my last column the word “elephant” suggesting that the issue or problem is so big and so heavy that no one wants to confront it or try to move it.

These “elephants” eventually become embedded in how the business operates and how family members interact at all levels. When ignored, a very large problem will continue to shadow whatever successes the family business has achieved and when the issues become emotional and highly charged, they can compromise the business and split the family apart.

For this article, instead of a black sheep, I will use “Fredo” as the “elephant in the room”.

Having a “Fredo” in the family is a result of inconsistencies that are far and wide. Fredo as a family member grew up with values such as unconditional love, being nurtured and equality among siblings while expectations of “Fredo” as a business manager or employee centers on performance, meritocracy and accountability.

Prof. Kimberly Eddleston explained it succinctly, “When this logic (of love and equality) transfers to the business, however, it can be dangerous since it encourages the family to compensate for the weaknesses and failings of family members and to forgive indiscretions.”

While it is indeed difficult for a family business leader to initiate change, it will always start with a firm resolve of separating the family and the business.

As part of my governance advocacy, every next generation family member interested to join the family business must demonstrate that they have something of value to contribute to the business. In short, the family member must apply just like any employee and be deserving of the employment.

We are aware that not all family members are capable, therefore I encourage leaders to resist the urge of including all family members in the business. Guaranteed employment may have been the practice of the founding generation but the growing complexity and the increasing number of family members have made it unwieldy to manage the family and the business.

To operationalize these initiatives, the enterprise must also invest in HR consultants and professional managers so they can formulate “best practices” policies and introduce an environment that promotes accountability, transparency and consequences for bad behaviors.

I am suggesting a few rules to avoid or deter a “Fredo” from creating problems for the family business:

  • Avoid hiring a “Fredo”
  • Develop and communicate rules of entry and exit for family members
  • With the guidance of an HR consultant, establish minimum standards for entry such as education level and years of experience. The rule of “No Nepotism” must apply
  • Do not create jobs for relatives. Avoid becoming an employer of last resort
  • Don’t force family members into the business if they are not interested. You are compromising the business by having demotivated, unfocused, dispassionate employees who happens to share your bloodline and last name
  • Do not reward bad behavior

Kim Eddelston also pointed out several points worth mentioning, “if you feel you must hire a family member with questionable abilities and drive, place him or her in a job where the rewards are based on commission, such as sales.

She also added that “having clear job requirements tend to decrease the prevalence of “Fredos” since they know what tasks are expected of them and how their performance will be evaluated.

And finally, Eddelston cautioned business leaders by raising the alarm bells regarding this issue: “do not allow family employees to have special privileges. This creates an us-against-them mentality with non-family employees, spurring feelings of injustice. It also encourages a sense of entitlement among family”