Tag Archives: business owner

Unlocking Your Full Potential

In one of my coaching engagements for a mid-sized family business last year, I recall censuring a next generation business leader in a QBR (quarterly business review) for failing to deliver on his performance targets.

The results were dismal and instead of owning up to the debacle, he ended up pointing fingers at his subordinates. While he was trying to absolve himself of any responsibility, I stood up and showed him two slides.

Slide 1 came from Tom Landry

“A Coach is someone who tells you what you don’t want to hear, who makes you see what you do not want to see, so that you can be who you have always known you can be.”

Slide 2 came from lightboxleadership.com

“Accept Responsibility for your actions. Be Accountable for your results and Take Ownership of your mistakes.”

The role of a Business Coach is to challenge business owners by way of visioning, accountability and encouragements. It also helps organizations enhance their operations, sales, marketing, management and so much more. Most importantly, just like a sporting coach, a Business Coach will make you focus on the game.

Business coaching is extremely effective in creating successful actions designed to move the business owner in a positive direction.  It is the partnering of client and coach in an extraordinary relationship aligned towards achieving big goals set in milestones. In my years of experience coaching organizations all over the world, a good example of a focused plan is to align organizations and its executives toward a possible listing in the stock exchange in the immediate future.

So, what exactly is business coaching?

Business coaching is for clients who are READY to make changes and improvements in their business. It gives the entrepreneur a business partner who doesn’t necessarily share in the business profits.  Anyone who’s ever had a business partner knows that partnerships are rarely equal. With a Business Coach, you’ll receive unbiased strategic advice for a retained monthly fee usually covering a number of hours, not 50% of your profits.

Business coaching is about SPEED, ACTION and ACCOUNTABILITY. Think about all the workshops and conferences you have attended where you learned a new technique or strategy that was never implemented. Your Business Coach will help you get it done and hold you accountable, but you must be ready to take action. The client does the work, not the coach.

Business coaching CHALLENGES the status quo and exact GOVERNANCE. Your Business Coach asks, “What are your challenges?  What are you NOT doing?  When are you going to do that?”

Business coaching promotes CLARITY OF ROLES between the owner and the professionals consistent with corporate as well as personal values.  When your values are aligned with your business, greater success is possible.

Business coaching helps the business owner create a SHARED VISION AND MISSION for the organization.  A business owner with a Vision is much more likely to succeed than one that doesn’t know where he’s going.

Business coaching helps the business owner identify OPPORTUNITIES.  A Business Coach can help you to see an opportunity you may have passed up.

Business coaching helps the business owner see his business through a DIFFERENT PAIR OF EYES.  A Business Coach can see what you don’t see.

Business coaching brings out the BEST in the entrepreneur.  Have you ever had someone truly interested in your success? Business coaching will push you out of your comfort zone, take you to your limits and in the end you will embrace it!

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Trust fund babies

THEY are referred to as children of wealthy parents who have lots of money set aside for them and often feel entitled. Everything they spend is paid for by their trust fund.

When you think of trust fund babies, you immediately think of socialite Paris Hilton, the celebrity great granddaughter of Conrad Hilton, the founder of Hilton Hotels.

In a Wikipedia article, critics and admirers have said that Hilton is “famous for being famous,” a celebrity not because of talent or work, but through inherited wealth and lifestyle.

I was in Singapore last week for my regular family governance work and was introduced to a business owner who narrated how his unprepared, ill-equipped eldest child mismanaged and almost caused the downfall of their 40-year-old business.

As the old man was talking to me and a colleague, he was shaking, groping for words and trying to make some sense out of the irreversible damage inflicted by the son’s entitlement. It was heartbreaking to learn that the assets were dissipated because of the son’s faulty judgments and his self-fulfilling prophecy that he should not be made accountable for his actions.

I finally got to meet the western-educated son over lunch, and as expected, he was cocky, abrasive and showed no traces of remorse for his failed actions. No doubt, he was, pun intended, an SOB (son of the business owner).

To conclude our lunch, I told him that he will no longer report to his father but to a functioning board comprising three members (his father included) and two independent directors. And that in my next session, a full audit report must be submitted to the board for review. Lastly, the son will also transmit all his initiatives and henceforth will strictly follow corporate governance policies.

To regain investor and creditor confidence, the son will also be required to sign an employment agreement that will monitor his performance based on financial metrics and qualitative variables.

Non-compliance of these rules and targets will result in his replacement by a non-family CEO within 12 months. He was still stunned with disbelief when I excused myself to catch a flight back to Manila.

The term trust fund baby is more of a stereotype for entitled kids who love to party but don’t even know the value of hard work. Having entitled and confused children in the family business is fraught with danger. When they are made to join the family business and there are no rules defining their participation, entry and exit, you would typically expect these children to act like spoiled brats and bully their way by demanding power without accountability.

Consultant Rick Johnson correctly stated that “an attitude of entitlement that is displayed openly can create major challenges for even the most successful family business.” This attitude is often displayed by the family member’s work ethic expecting every employee to “live to work” and give of themselves unconditionally while Junior takes off every Friday afternoon or goes on extended vacations.

Johnson further expounds that these children often manage with an autocratic style with little empathy for employees and leaving the impression that they can do whatever they want because they will run the company someday.

What Johnson highlighted is a very common sight among family members working in successful family businesses in Asia and the next generation “owner mentality” is causing a lot of sleepless nights for parents, founders and business owners.

The fear and paranoia are real as the sense of entitlement feeds into the child’s last name as a birthright then degenerates into a mindset of an owner mentality.

To be continued.

*****

Prof. Soriano is a National Agora Awardee for Marketing Excellence, an ASEAN Family Business Advisor, Book Author and Executive Director of ASEAN-based Consulting group, W+B Strategic Advisory. He is also an International Business Lecturer and Professor at the Ateneo Graduate School of Business.
He is the author of two bestselling books related to Family Business Governance and Succession.
Those interested to order can call the W+B Group 09228603186 and look for Ms. Aira.